Fire lighting – Ignition

The Fire Triangle in action

This article outlines the main fire lighting options that are specific to bushcraft applications, in the Northern Hemisphere.

There are a number of ways to light a fire, with various tinder and ignition options available.

What you use will ultimately depend on your environment and what you have with you.

For this article, we will concentrate on the equipment used to start a fire, using a spark, flame or other magical force.

After reading this post, you should have a solid understanding of the different firefighting methods available and how to implement them effectively in the outdoor environment.

Matches

Picture of matchbox
Matchbox

Although it has slightly fallen out of favour to the more widely used lighter, the humble match is still a great option for fire lighting, as long as you take a few precautions.

It is good practice to become proficient at lighting a fire with just one match.

This way you do not to go through all your matches just to get a single fire lit.

Ideally, you should be aiming for one match, one fire!

This is easier said than done, but with practice and with the correct preparation, this can be achieved consistently.

Remember, prepare your kindling and fuel in advance, so that everything is ready to go.

Good practice

Keep the matches dry: it sounds obvious, but it’s easy to forget about your matches until you go to use them.

Matches and moisture don’t do well together – the heads will soften and disintegrate when trying to strike them.

Store your matches correctly, in a dry environment.

A dedicated waterproof matchbox is the best bet, such as a 35mm film canister, with a section of the striker glued to the inside lid.

If you have the time, you can also make one out of birch bark.

Ray Mears has a video on how to make one below:

How to light a match correctly

Everyone can light a match, can’t they? Well yes, but most don’t do it correctly. And why would they?

Most of the time it’s not the end of the world if you go through a few matches at home, lighting the BBQ or some candles.

If you are out in the field though, away from it all, it can really matter!

You need to get maximum use out of those matches and not use half the box to get a fire lit.

It may be your only ignition source, so learn to make them count.

Correct fire lighting technique

Assuming your matches are dry, the most important thing to have ready, before you even think about getting a match out of the box, is your kindling and main fuel source.

Using a standard pack of matches, find out which way the heads are facing. 

If the weather is dry, open the matches however you like. It will not make much difference.

Should it be raining or snowing though, open the pack from the other end (stick end) and keep the open end pointing downwards.

Put your back to the wind if it is raining, to shield the pack even further.

This is to stop any chance of a water droplet, or snowflake, getting in there, potentially ruining your match heads.

Assuming your hands are dry, take one match from the box by pulling one out and downwards.

Close the box. 

Hold the box in one hand, with the striker facing towards the match in the other hand.

Grip the match at the bottom of the stick with your index finger and thumb.

You now also want to place your middle finger directly on the match head itself.

This provides support to the match head and minimises the chance of it snapping on you.

If you have not done this before, you can be forgiven for being a little nervous about burning this finger when you go to strike the match.

However, in practice, the striking action is so fast, that your finger will be well out the way of the burning match head before it gets a chance to burn you.

You should naturally remove the middle finder when you strike and just have the match gripped between the thumb and index finger.

Strike the match!

Now that you have lit the match, immediately cup your hands and shield the flame.

You do not want the flame blowing out from a gust of wind. 

After a few seconds, the flame should establish and the main wooden stick should start to take and establish a stronger flame.

Now carefully take your flame to your kindling and keep it shielded while you ignite it. 

Once you have lit the kindling, you should now have an established flame that you can slowly build on with your different wood sizes, until you have a well-established fire.

Once the fire is stable and doesn’t need your constant attention, place the matches back in their box – not on damp ground.

Place back inside your pocket/backpack etc, to ensure they are kept dry.

You only used one match didn’t you, so you have plenty left for next time 🙂

Cigarette lighters

Clipper Lighter Bushcraft Firelighting
Standard refillable gas lighter

It doesn’t need much explaining and indeed some would regard it as cheating, but we all use lighters from time to time. 

They are fast and reliable.

Even though this is a common igniter, I would 100% advise that you practice and become proficient in the other methods (match, firesteel, etc), in all weathers.

This ensures that you can light a fire confidently, in a variety of conditions and environments, with multiple ignition options at your disposal.

If one fails you have another to use – it always pays to have a backup option.

Gas lighters

The disposable type is the most common and what most people think of when they think of a lighter.

I would urge you not to use disposable lighters if you can, as they are not great for the environment.

A good standard one that I like is the Clipper. They are refillable and you can replace the flints in them when needed.

They also just work! 

Windproof lighters: Another gas option is the windproof type – sometimes known as a butane torch.

These are designed for lighting up in bad conditions, by providing a jet like flame.

They use a piezo ignition and create quite a roar, which in turn uses up more gas than the standard type above.

The only problem with these types of lighter is that I am yet to find one that is reliable, as they all seem to break pretty quickly and stop igniting, hence me not recommending them.

If you do find a good one though, please let me know in the comments below.

Petrol lighters

Black Zippo Lighter
My trusty Zippo

One of my favourites is the petrol lighter, or to be exact a Zippo.

I just really like these and have used my trusty black version for donkey’s years.

They are solid and have that great unique ‘Zippo’ sound when opening and closing.

They are refillable, using the recommended specific lighter fluid – but at a push, you can also use other fuels, such as petrol or Coleman fuel.

Be very careful with these though and follow directions.

You can also replace the flints and wicks on them – and genuine Zippos also come with a lifetime guarantee.

The fuel can evaporate if left for a while, but if you are a regular user, these are a great option.

Correct technique

Using a lighter is pretty instinctive and I’m not going to insult you my telling how to light one up. There is only one way to do it.

However, I will mention trying to avoid rolling the strike wheel the wrong way, as this messes up the flint. That’s all I will say.

Once lit, as with matches, cup your hands to protect the flame whilst it ignites your kindling.

Place back in your pocket and get that fire roaring!

Ferro rods

Swedish Fire Steel - Light My Fire - Ferro Rod - Ferrocerium - Fire Lighting
Swedish Fire Steel – Light My Fire

The original ferro rods were composed of a mixture of 30% iron (ferrum) and the rare earth metal cerium – hence ferrocerium rod.

In recent times, this has been shortened to ferro rod, but is also known as a Swedish fire steel – or just fire steel.

Modern-day ferro rods are made from an alloy of rare-earth metals, known as mischmetal, which includes iron and magnesium to harden the material.

When struck with the back of a knife, or metallic striker, this action causes the metals to shed from the rod and combust.

This produces incredibly hot sparks – that can reach temperatures of around 3000 deg ℃ (5432 ℉).

If you have a good dry tinder such as some scraped birch bark or amadou, these sparks will ignite it very efficiently, with just a few strokes.

Ferro rods are incredibly simple in design and will last a very long time – that is their beauty.

They are very low maintenance and will still strike in all conditions, even if it is wet and cold.

They are an excellent tool, even if you only carry one as a backup to your lighter – I would always recommend carrying one when you are out.


Which ones are good?

Most firesteels are able to create a good shower of sparks.

Some are easier to use than others, with different lengths coming into play and handle options.

Some people like to take the time to make a custom firesteel, by affixing a handle made from deer antler or similar onto a blank rod. This makes for a nice looking tool.

Most standard options have a plastic handle though and are a solid, no-fuss option.

The one I currently use is the Light My Fire – 2.0 firesteel.

Light My Fire are a Swedish company, with their factory based in Västervik

They have been around a long time, and this simple to use and uncomplicated design makes this a great choice if you are looking for a decent ferro rod.

Flint and steel

Flint and steel striker in hand - fire lighting
Traditional flint and steel striker

The flint and steel is a traditional and time served fire lighting method.

When the steel striker hits the flint, the flint removes a very small piece of the striker’s metal and this creates a spark.

Not the other way around as is commonly believed.

You will not get anywhere near the same amount of sparks as you would with a fire steel, but this method does work and is ultra reliable.

The sparks produced are known as ‘cold sparks’, so you will need to be patient and try and catch one while it’s still glowing.

If you manage to get this spark to land on your chosen tinder, such as char cloth or some birch bark, you can then blow on this to encourage ignition.

As per the video below, you will need a nice sharp stone for this to work correctly, so that the small fragments of metal are removed.

Flint is ideal for this due to its ability to shed material and leave an incredibly sharp edge as it flakes away.

You can obtain some locally, or bring some in and keep it in a pouch along with your striker and tinder.

With some practice and correct technique, this is a great, reliable method, that has very little to go wrong.

Fire piston

Camp Fire Piston - Slam Rod - Fire Starter
The Camp Fire Piston – USA made

A fire piston – sometimes known as a slam rod – uses compressed air to ignite a small piece of tinder.

The fire piston is made up of two sections, one male part, one female.

The tinder – usually a piece of char cloth (see below) – is placed at the end section of the male part.

The male part then slides into the female (sorry).

When pushed down with force, the airtight seal causes the air inside to compress and raises the temperature to around 250 ℃.

This is usually hot enough to ignite the tinder.

The male part can now be removed and the ember placed onto your awaiting main tinder.

You can now blow on this to get your fire going.

Which one to get

There are a multitude of fire pistons on the market, with the bulk coming from China.

If you can, go for an American made fire piston.

One that works and also looks great is the Campfire Piston. It is made in the USA out of hickory wood.

A good video showing the fire piston in use can be viewed below:

Bow drill

A bow drill set is a great tool to use in the Northern Hemisphere and can create a good ember even with slightly damp wood.

You will need the following parts to create one:

Bow section: the main part that is drawn back and forward to create the drilling action. This is a formed from a carefully selected tree branch.

Cord: this attaches to the bow and is what grips and spins the drill. 550 paracord is usually used for this.

Drill section: this is what spins and ‘drills’ into the hearth below to create an ember.

Bearing block: used to create a low friction ‘cup’ that sits on top of the drill section and is held in place with your non-dominant hand.

Hearth: the base section of wood that stays fixed in place and is ‘drilled’ into, to create an ember.

Ray Mears demonstrates the process in the video below:

For an even more detailed look, MCQBushcraft has an excellent video on this also.

Magnifying glass

A very basic but effective method is to start a fire from a lense, usually a magnifying glass.

If you carry a standard plate compass, such as the Silva Expedition 4, then you will have a magnifying lens built into the compass.

You do need bright sunlight for this to work, but assuming the sun is strong enough, you can move the lens closer to the tinder until you have a small concentrated spot of light, that is laser focussed on your tinder.

If the beam of light is intense enough, the tinder will start to smoke and with a little help – eventually, ignite.

This is a great method to use, as it enables your compass to have a dual purpose.

Not much use if it’s cloudy though!

Summary

As you can see, there are many different ways to get a fire going. I would encourage you to try and master as many methods as you can.

Not only is it fun, it could save your bacon one day and is certainly not wasted effort.

We positively encourage you to leave a comment below or contact us to let us know what you think, good or bad.

We read them all.

Until the next time….

James

Bushcraft Hub

What is the Best Bushcraft Stove?

Bushcraft liquid fuel stove - MSR XGK EX

Although it is generally preferable to cook on an open fire, there are times when you will want, or indeed need, some form of bushcraft stove.

Fast and reliable, they will get things cooking in minutes.

So what’s available?

Wood burning camp stoves

If you can’t have an open fire due to it not being practical, or perhaps they are prohibited at your location, then you may be able to use a wood-burning camping stove.

These are also sometimes known as Hobo Stoves.

If used with wood, these are as close to an open fire as you can get, whilst having the benefit of keeping the flame concentrated and controlled.

Of course, the main benefit of a wood-fired stove is that you can operate them using free fuel.

This is presuming this is available at your location, or you have brought some in with you.

Most of these stoves are fairly compact, with some being foldable.

They pack down into a smaller carry bag, making them suitable for transportation.

These stoves are primarily designed to burn small twigs and sticks, but most will also run on a variety of other fuels if required.

This includes hexy blocks or meths/alcohol.

Some will even let you incorporate a gas burner.

There are various models and designs on the market, with some performing a lot better than others.

The main options are the foldable box type or the wood gas type.

Box type

Honey Wood Stove - Bushcraft
Backpacking Light’s Honey Stove

The box type wood stoves feature a series of sections that slot together, allowing for different configurations, providing a solid base and pot support.

A popular choice is the Honey Stove which is made by Backpacking Light.

The Honey Stove consists of multiple pieces that can be constructed in a variety of fashions.

You can alter this depending on what you are cooking/boiling and what fuel you are using.

This stove allows for many fuel types including dry leaves, grass, wood, hexamine blocks, to name a few.

It can also incorporate a meths burner (Trangia type) and will even utilise an Optimus Nova burner if required.

All in all, it’s a very versatile choice for bushcraft activities.

These stoves fold down to a very compact size and are therefore ideal for transportation.

Similar alternatives to the Honey Stove include the Firebox or BushBox XL.

Wood gas stoves (Solostove)

Solo Stove Lite Wood Gas Stove
Solo Stove Lite

These types of stoves are usually cylindrical in design and incorporate an external jacket.

How does a wood burning camp stove work?

This jacket funnels warm air (taken from the external vents below), upwards.

This warm air is then deposited into the top of the main fire compartment, via the internal vent holes, just above the flames.

The Solo Stove diagram below shows the process in more detail.

Solo Stove Airflow Diagram

As you can see in the diagram, the airflow process effectively fans the flames, similar to when you blow on a fire to get it roaring.

This creates a hotter, cleaner burn, and also helps to reduce soot build-up.

The above process will begin to happen once the fire in the main compartment has warmed the stove up to operating temperature.

Wood stove round-up

Whether you opt for the box or wood gas type, these stoves are very popular and have very little to go wrong.

They are therefore a great choice if you are looking for a no-nonsense stove, that should last for many years.

The fact that most can also incorporate other fuels, such as meths or hexy blocks, is an added bonus and further increases their versatility in the field.

The main consideration on which type to go for would be transportation.

If you want one that can fold away into a flat package, the box type is probably your best bet.

They take a little assembling, and they can be a little frustrating to put together at times, but once together, they are solid.

If portability isn’t your primary concern and you are happy with a fixed unit, the wood gas type is a great option.

These are already good to go, so are great from a time perspective, but do not fully pack down.

Your choice will ultimately boil down to space and your trip length.

What is a Solostove?

A Solostove is a type of wood gas stove that is cylindrical in design and incorporates a jacket, so that cold air can be drawn upwards from the bottom of the stove, warmed by the flames and then delivered to the top of the stove where it fans the flame and produces a hotter burn.

See the image above for a visual description.

What is a twig stove?

A twig stove is a type of camping/outdoor stove that uses natural materials, such as dry twigs, leaves, pine cones, pine needles etc.

These stoves are a great option if you have a reliable supply of fuel as they can be run on free to find materials.

Additionally, some models allow you to incorporate a basic burner, such as a Trangia or you can just use a basic hexy block. See above for more on these.

Meth burners

Trangia Meth Alcohol Burner Bushcraft Stove
Trangia Spirit Burner

Sometimes known as an alcohol or spirit burner, this style of stove is another simple option for bushcraft activities.

They are generally known as Trangias, although this is a brand name and they are not all made by Trangia.

These stoves are small in design, lightweight and portable.

You will need some form of pot support as well, as these will not generally work with a pot placed directly on them.

However, there are many options available.

How does a Trangia work?

These burners all work on the same principle, in that you partially fill the main central chamber with fuel, then light it.

The main chamber will slowly burn (sometimes it’s very hard to see) and heat up the stove and fuel.

Once it is up to operating temperature, the fuel that is in the outside chamber, starts to vapourise.

This vapour then rises up to the small pinprick vents at the top, where it combusts.

This is often referred to as ‘blooming’ and means the burner is now ready to cook on.

Trangia spirit burner

The Trangia Spirit Burner pictured above is the best known and most widely used meth/alcohol burner out there.

Low cost, virtually indestructible and brilliantly simple in its design, this is a fantastic, relatively lightweight stove, with a multitude of applications.

Designed back in 1951, at Trangia’s headquarters in Sweden, not much has changed.

It is made of brass, with a weight of 110g and consists of the main burner unit, screw-on lid and a simmer ring.

The simmer ring’s design allows the flame to be regulated and also allows you to extinguish the burner completely when finished.

The stove is designed to run on methylated spirits (denatured alcohol). This fuel can be obtained very cheaply from your local hardware store.

It is worth noting that this burner can be used on its own if it is placed in a sheltered depression and your cooking vessel suspended above.

In general, though, the spirit burner is designed to be used inside a cooking system.

Examples include Trangia’s popular 25-2 cooking set or other makes such as the Honey Stove mentioned above.

The meth (or alcohol burner) is an extremely simple and effective cooking system, that has stood the test of time.

Esbit alcohol burner stove

Esbit Alcohol Burner Methylated Stove - bushcraft stoves
Esbit alcohol stove

A good alternative to the Trangia is the Esbit Alcohol Burner.

It is based on the Trangia, however, the Esbit also incorporates a foldaway handle, that operates the simmer ring.

This lessens the possibility of you burning your fingers when adjusting the flame – making it more user friendly.

You can purchase the Esbit here: USA | UK | CAN

Gas stoves

MSR Pocket Rocket 2 Gas Stove
MSR PocketRocket 2 Gas Stove

One of the most convenient and simple options out there is the gas stove.

As long as you have a ready supply of canisters, these stoves are a great choice for your cooking needs.

They provide a quick, clean heat-source, providing minimum hassle for the user. They are just as quick to dismantle and pack away.

Gas selection

Historically, gas canisters were 100% butane. This is the worst performing gas for stoves.

In the early days, 100% butane fueled gas stoves struggled to work at all in cold conditions.

This is due to the fact that butane’s boiling point is approximately -2 deg C.

Essentially, this means that below -2 deg C, butane gas reverts back into a liquid.

It, therefore, loses its pressure and does not want to leave the canister, as it is no longer a gas.

This doesn’t help matters if you are relying on it to ignite.

What gas do you use for a camping stove? The modern solution

In more recent years, nearly all gas canisters are a butane/propane mix, generally around 70% butane and 30% propane.

Propane has a much lower boiling point of around -42 deg C.

When combined with butane, the mixture provides good performance well into the minus figures.

Another gas commonly used in isobutane.

This shares the same chemical structure as butane but delivers higher pressure, which increases flame performance.

If you want to read more about gas stove fuel options see the MSR article here.

Modern gas stoves may struggle at extreme altitudes, but for most applications, they will operate absolutely fine.

Due to the above, these stoves are slowly becoming the choice of professional mountaineers.

This is due to their simplicity and the fact that they are generally more lightweight and safer in use than liquid fuel options.

Fuel availability

One thing with gas stoves is that you do need to have the correct gas canister cartridge for your stove.

You also need to be able to find these fairly easily should you need to get replacements.

This is not usually a problem in more developed parts of the world, but may be an issue in more remote regions.,

Make sure to check this before setting off if you are likely to need more.

How does a camping stove work?

In general, most gas stoves simply require you to:

  • attach the gas canister by screwing it onto the burner (clockwise)
  • deploy the pan and stove supports (if any)
  • turn on gas by opening the valve
  • ignite

Simplicity!

Some stoves even feature an integrated piezo ignition, which ignites the gas for you when you turn on the gas.

This is a handy feature to have.

However, even if your stove has this, you should always carry an alternative form of ignition.

This could be a ferro rod or lighter, in case the piezo ignition fails for whatever reason.

Top-mounted canister stoves

This is the most common type (see picture above). The gas canister screws onto the bottom of the burner and acts as the stove’s base.

Because of this, top-mounted stoves require a very stable and level surface to place the complete unit on.

This style of stove set-up often becomes top-heavy.

This is especially true if you have a lot of liquid in the cooking vessel that might slosh from side to side.

This sloshing can then end up tipping the stove over, including your food.

It is therefore important to site the stove correctly in the first place, on a flat, level surface.

Be vigilant of any gusts of wind that might have your pot toppling.

You also need to guard against you or your companions knocking into it.

Although the above is a bit of a drawback with this style, the fact that they are simple and generally cheaper than other designs, makes them a popular and solid choice for your bushcraft cooking needs.

Remote mounted canister stoves

Primus Express Spider 2 Gas Stove - bushcraft stoves
Primus Express Spider 2

This style of gas stove is by far the most stable, due to the burner being much lower to the ground and having a set of wide legs for stabilisation and support.

The gas canister is attached to a hose that allows the canister to sit to one side, adjacent to the burner.

However, due to the additional materials used, they are generally a little more expensive to buy than the top-mounted style.

Other than that, they generally operate in much the same way as topmounted stoves.

Liquid fuel portable stoves

MSR XGK EX Liquid Fuel Stove
MSR XGK EX

Liquid fuel stoves generally cost more than their gas-fired cousins.

They also usually weigh more and involve a bit more effort in their operation.

With this in mind, why would you choose to opt for liquid fuel over the more common gas cartridge type?

What are the advantages of a liquid fuel stove?

In most cases, it chiefly centers around the fuel that you can obtain.

If you are operating in remote locations, for extended periods, a liquid fuel stove may be the better option over gas or other types.

The reason for this is that gas canisters are not always readily available should you run out.

They are usually stocked in outdoor shops and available online.

However, if you are out of area and certainly if you are in a different country, you may not be able to come across them quite so easily.

You can obviously bring 1 or 2 in your pack when you are on shorter outings.

For extended trips though, such as expeditions etc, you need to be mindful of how much fuel you are likely to use.

It is likely that you will find that you do not have the room to be taking heaps of gas canisters with you.

Added to this, once used, empty gas canisters need to be brought out with you and disposed of responsibly.

This creates additional dead weight and space that you will have to carry out with you.

Here lies the advantage of liquid fuel stoves!

In most places around the world, you can find some form of fuel to use in your stove.

Available fuels

Most liquid fuel stoves burn a variety of fuels, that are readily available across the globe, so you should never (hopefully) find yourself without a fuel source.

These include – white gas (also known as Coleman Fuel), petrol (auto gasoline), kerosene, diesel and more.

Read more on this here.

If you are travelling by vehicle, an additional benefit is that the stove can share the same fuel as the vehicle.

This can simplify things by eliminating the need for additional fuel storage.

How much fuel should you carry for your trip? Check out this MSR article here.

Economy

Because they can run on standard unleaded petrol or in some cases diesel and other fuels, they tend to be more cost-effective, when compared to resealable gas canisters.

This is especially true if you are on an extended trip.

This needs to be balanced with the fact that they are usually more costly to buy.

However, over the lifetime of the stove, this difference is negligible.

Safety procedures for using a liquid fuel stove

There are safety considerations to take on board when using liquid fuel stoves.

You have a bottle of extremely flammable liquid, usually petrol or similar, a few inches away from a roaring burner.

This sounds worse than it actually is, as the stove is obviously designed to operate this way and is safe as long as you use it sensibly.

How to fill a liquid stove fuel bottle

MSR Stove Liquid Fuel Bottles
MSR Fuel Bottles

One of the big things to remember is to wipe everything down after filling the fuel bottle, as you will no doubt spill a small amount whilst doing this.

Tip – It sounds obvious, but do not fill the bottle over its max fill line.

If you do, when you go to insert the pump, it will spurt out fuel all over your hands and the bottle, as the fuel pump takes up quite a bit of volume.

Only operate the stove once the stove is properly connected and you are sure there is no fuel residue left on the outside.

Can you use a camping stove inside a tent?

As with any stove, only use in a well-ventilated area. It’s not a great idea to use stoves inside of tents.

Apart from the obvious reason of potentially burning the tent down, you can get carbon monoxide poisoning too.

Follow the instructions and use some common sense and you won’t go too far wrong.

Remember, gas and other stoves are potentially hazardous too.

How to use a liquid fuel stove

One thing to note is that liquid fuel stoves require priming before they will work.

This means that a small amount of fuel is pumped into the stove and burnt off before it can be used properly.

The main purpose of priming is to heat up the section of metal tube that sits over the top of the burner.

This is known as the Generator Tube.

This is what fuel passes through before it reaches the burner. Once this is warm, it transfers heat to the fuel passing through it.

This, in turn, enables the now heated fuel to vapourise and combust correctly when it reaches the actual burner.

Stove Maintenance

MSR Expedition Service Kit for MSR Stoves
MSR Expedition Service Kit

There are more moving parts on a liquid fuel stove as opposed to gas.

Due to this, although very reliable, it is essential to carry some form of field repair kit if you are relying on your stove to function effectively.

Most of the stoves mentioned below will come with a small parts kit included.

However, it is wise to bolster this with some extra parts such as those included in the MSR expedition service kit.

Periodic maintenance of the stove is required to ensure long term performance.

The MSR expedition service kits will cover most eventualities in the field and are a good item to carry with you.

If looked after, and properly maintained, these stoves should last a lifetime.

Summary

There are many options available when selecting a bushcraft stove.

If you have a good supply of small twigs etc and don’t mind longer boil times, the closest and most environmentally sustainable option is the wood type, such as the Solo Stove, or Honey Stove.

The fact that this fuel is usually free and readily available, further adds to their appeal.

However, if you want or need to go down the fuel route, meths, gas and liquid fuel stoves are all excellent in their own right.

Your choice will depend on the environment you will be in at the time, trip length and of course, personal preference.

Hopefully, this post has outlined the main bushcraft stove options available.

If you feel you would like anything else mentioned, please leave a comment below or use the contact us page and I will do my best to oblige.

Thanks for your visit today