How Long Does It Take for a Morel Mushroom to Grow to Full Size?

It can take anywhere from two to five years for the mycelium to become established and produce a good colony of morel mushrooms in the wild.

Once the mycelium are established though and conditions are right, morels can first appear within a few days after a heavy rain event, growing to their full size in just another day or so.

Monitor any discovered morel patch regularly in order to catch them at the perfect moment for harvesting following rainfall.

Morel Mushroom Basics

True Morels Vs False Morels

When foraging for morel mushrooms, it’s essential to understand the difference between true morels and false morels.

True morels (Morchella spp.) are highly sought-after edible mushrooms, while false morels (Gyromitra spp.) can be toxic when consumed, especially when eaten raw.

True morels have a distinctive honeycomb-like cap, while false morels feature a wrinkled, brain-like texture.

Always examine the cap and stem: true morels have a continuous, connected cap and stem, while the cap of a false morel is often loosely attached to the stem.

Additionally, always cross reference with at least two trusted field guides, to ensure you have the correct type before you consume

Species of Morels

There are several species of true morel mushrooms, with Morchella esculenta being one of the most common and widespread.

This species features a pale, yellowish cap with a distinctive honeycomb pattern.

Other species of morels include:

  • Morchella deliciosa: This morel species has a similar appearance to M. esculenta, but its cap is more uniformly round with a slightly darker colour.
  • Morchella elata: This darker brown morel is typically found in coniferous forests and has an elongated, conical shape.
  • Morchella rufobrunnea: Recognisable by its reddish-brown cap, this morel species can be found in grassy areas and open woodlands.

There may be more than 80 different species of Morchella, but not all are edible or commonly found in the wild.

While hunting for morels, it’s crucial to learn the distinguishing characteristics of the species found in your region and take caution to avoid misidentifying and consuming potentially harmful lookalikes.

Growth and Life Cycle

Morel mushrooms have a fascinating growth and life cycle.

To understand how long it takes for a morel mushroom to grow to full size, it’s essential to consider its life cycle.

The entire lifecycle of a morel mushroom can be as brief as two to three weeks.

Before the morel mushroom starts popping up, the mycelium forms beneath the soil.

The mycelium is a network of thread-like structures that absorb nutrients from the soil and help the mushroom to grow.

Once the mycelium is established, it can take as little as six days from the time shoots appear until full-sized mushrooms are ready to harvest.

The fruiting body of the morel mushroom, which is the part you harvest and cook, begins to emerge above the soil as the temperature and moisture levels become optimal.

The ideal conditions for morel growth are daytime temperatures in the low 50s (10 deg C) and nighttime temperatures in the mid 40s (4.5 deg C).

Cloudy, overcast conditions with scattered rain can extend the growing and harvesting period.

The weather has a significant influence on the growth of morel mushrooms.

In summary, the life cycle of morel mushrooms is relatively short, with the fruiting bodies taking just a few weeks to grow under the right conditions.

However, it takes many years for the mycelium to become established in the first place, which is why wild morel patches are so valuable to foragers.

Trees and Morels

Tree species play a crucial role in morel growth.

Many morel mushrooms grow in a symbiotic relationship with specific tree species, exchanging nutrients for carbohydrates through their root-like threads called mycorrhiza ^.

This connection is particularly important when understanding where to find and how morels grow.

Elm Trees

Elm trees make for excellent morel hunting grounds, as they provide an ideal environment for the mushrooms to grow.

Look for dying or dead elm trees with bark starting to fall off, as this is where morels typically thrive.

Oak Trees

Oak trees are another common host for morel mushrooms. Search for mature oak trees, specifically those with spreading limbs that allow sunlight to filter through.

This dappled light creates the perfect conditions for morels to grow.

Deciduous Trees

In general, morel mushrooms favour deciduous forests.

These forests contain a diverse range of tree species, increasing the chances of encountering morel-friendly environments.

When exploring deciduous woodlands, also look for poplar, ash, and sycamore trees, as they can also host morels.

Apple Trees

Old apple orchards can be a hidden gem for morel hunters.

Morels often grow near the roots of these trees, so pay close attention to the ground surrounding them.

However, be cautious of pesticides in old orchards and always thoroughly clean any mushrooms found in these areas.

Identifying Places for Morels

To increase your chances of finding morel mushrooms, it’s essential to identify the preferred habitats of these elusive fungi.

Morels typically grow in forests and wooded areas, where they can be found thriving among leaf litter, pine needles, and early season vegetation.

In the early part of the season, which is typically late March in many regions, keep an eye out for south-facing slopes.

These areas tend to warm up faster than other parts of the forest, providing an ideal environment for early season morels to emerge.

As the season progresses, heading into late spring, begin searching for morels in north-facing slopes and valleys.

These spots tend to have cooler temperatures and retain moisture longer, offering perfect conditions for morel growth.

Pay close attention to areas where the ground is covered in decomposing leaves and moist soil.

When scouting for morel habitats, consider these great places to start your search:

  • Near the bases of dead or decaying trees, particularly elm, ash, and oak.
  • Areas recently disturbed by logging or forest fires, as morels often grow in abundance following these events.
  • Beneath apple, cherry, and plum trees, as morels are known to favour their roots.
  • In proximity to riverbanks and streams, where the soil is consistently damp and nutrient-rich.

Remember, patience and persistence are key when searching for morel mushrooms. Keep exploring different locations within your chosen spot, carefully inspecting the ground and surrounding vegetation.

As your knowledge and experience grow, you’ll become familiar with the ideal habitats and conditions for finding morels, making your future hunting expeditions increasingly successful.

Harvesting and Enjoying Morels

When you head out to collect morel mushrooms, bringing a few essentials can help you effectively find and preserve these tasty morsels.

One useful tool is a mesh bag, which allows spores to disperse as you collect morels, increasing the likelihood of future morel growth in the area.

As you find morels, it’s a good idea to gently twist and pull them from the ground, avoiding damage to the surrounding area.

Make sure you store your fresh morels with care, as they have a delicate, meaty texture that can be easily bruised if mishandled.

Cooking and consuming fresh morels is a delightful culinary experience. Before you cook them, make sure to clean the mushrooms thoroughly to remove any dirt or debris.

Some popular ways to enjoy morels include:

  • Sautéing with butter or oil
  • Adding to pasta dishes or risotto
  • Using in a creamy soup

Regardless of your preferred method of preparation, make sure to cook your morels fully, as they should never be consumed raw.

In summary, morel mushrooms require just a few weeks to grow to full size, and with proper harvesting techniques like using mesh bags, you can enjoy these delectable fungi at their best. So grab your gear, stay patient, and get ready to cherish your fresh, meaty morel mushrooms!

Safety Measures

When foraging for morel mushrooms, it’s crucial to follow some essential safety measures to ensure you’re picking the right ones.

First, familiarise yourself with the appearance of genuine morel mushrooms.

Morels can be identified by their distinctive honeycomb-like structure on the cap and are usually 2 to 5 inches in size.

Double-check the mushrooms you find to ensure they have these characteristics.

Be careful when distinguishing between edible morels and toxic lookalikes. False morels can be harmful if consumed, so it’s vital to observe the differences between them.

While true morels have a hollow stem, the toxic ones have a solid or cottony interior stem. Always cut open the mushrooms you pick to verify their identity.

Here are some tips to stay safe while hunting for morel mushrooms:

  • Never consume wild mushrooms without proper identification.
  • Learn to recognise toxic mushroom species in your area to avoid accidentally harvesting them.
  • Seek guidance from experienced foragers or local mycological groups.
  • Start by hunting for morels in well-known, established areas, where you’re less likely to encounter harmful mushrooms.
  • Use a mushroom identification guide or app as an additional resource, but never rely solely on technology for identification.

Remember, even edible mushrooms can cause adverse reactions in some individuals.

When trying a new type of wild mushroom, it’s recommended to taste a small amount first and wait for any potential effects before eating larger quantities.

By keeping these safety measures in mind, you can enjoy the process of foraging for delectable morel mushrooms while minimising the risk of ingesting harmful or toxic varieties.

Looking for more? Take a look at our foraging section.

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